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Waterfront Arts Festival award winners talk about their art
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Among the artists at the Waterfront Arts Festival in Escanaba Saturday, judges choose the best in various categories. They were recognized at their booths during the event.

Kim Buell of Wetmore won Best of Show and Best of Jewelry at the Waterfront Arts Festival Saturday in Escanaba. She describes herself as a gather. She uses items she collects from beaches to make jewelry.

"It amazes me how they understand how unique it is and that's the part that feels so goo. They have never seen anything like it and yet they are accepting of it and they like the display. I have rocks and driftwood out for my display because that is where I get my inspiration," Buell said.

She says it's good to know that people appreciate her work.

Bob Liss of Escanaba won Best of 3D Art. This was his second time at the Festival.

"I love doing segmented wood, bowls and vases. The more pieces the better it is. You let the wood tell you what to do as you're turning it or as you're processing it. It kind of dictates what you're going to end up with," Liss said.

Best Pottery went to Cindy Wedig of Gwinn. She said the reaction from festival-goers was good.

"I think they were very positive, not just with mine but with every booth," she said. "They think it's fun and different and they really like it."

Lisa Kangas of Escanaba was named Best in Painting and Drawing.

"My artwork is very colorful, a lot of teal, a lot of lakes and water. Everybody has a lot of wows!" said Kangas.

Best of Photography went to Shelley Densmore of Munising. She photographs Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore near her home.

"I was a big kayaker and hiker for years and years. I started photography to capture the fambulous scenes that are out there," Densmore said.

Barry Dalberto of Stanley, Wisconsin for Best of Fiber for his wooden baskets.

"They like that they are unique enough, that no one else seems to be using the curly birch bark that I have to gather," he said about the reaction to the baskets.

Best Mixed Media went to Donna Beck of Ishpeming who presses and frames flowers.

"I like that people can enjoy them for longer than the few days that they last on the branches. It's nice to see the joy it brings to people," Beck said.

She said the art show was amazing and has enjoyed the many years that she has been able to be a part of the festival.

 

 
Isabelle and Georgia Reed are almost ready for the Waterfront Arts Festival. They have had fun making Michigan plaques, barrettes, pins, magnets, bookmarks, jewelry and more.

They have both decided that part of their proceeds will go to projects they love. The girls are donating a portion of their Young Artists’ Market income as well as collecting donations at Waterfront (at their YAM table) for Missoula Children’s Theater and the Delta Animal Shelter.

The girls have been involved in the Missoula Children's Theatre plays, Georgia for four years and Isabelle for three. This is Isa's project.

The Reeds have recently move to Cornell and the family has decided to get their first family dog. Georgia's project is the Delta Animal shelter. She loves her cats but is equally excited about getting a dog.

They have collected bottles and cans to start their donation jars.

 

Youth artists (ages 18 and younger) can sign up to sell their creations at the Young Artists’ Market, facilitated by the Bonifas Arts Center, at this summer’s Waterfront Art Festival.

The Young Artists’ Market tent will be open Aug. 5 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., with table setup starting at 8 a.m., in Ludington Park.

Each artist will have four feet of table space and may sell any type of art or craft. In the past, young artists have sold creations such as pottery, wind chimes, ceramic ornaments, clay photo coasters, jewelry, and body products, said Carla Meyer, Bonifas special events coordinator.

The Bonifas aims to encourage youths to create and to help them acquire business skills, said Meyer.

All work must be created by youths, though a limited amount of adult assistance is acceptable. Youths must submit an application, artwork samples, and a $5 registration fee to the Bonifas by July 22 at 3 p.m.

Download Young Artist's Market Application »

 

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Music, beautiful sunshine, food and a wide variety of artistic displays made for a wonderful day in Ludington Park Saturday. More than 50 artists participated this year at the annual Waterfront Art Festival.

"What a fabulous festival this year," said Pasqua Warstler, Bonifas artistic director. "Traffic was lively, spirits were high and we had amazing artists across the park."

Artists donated a piece of their artwork for the Waterfront Raffle. The jars filled up with tickets as participants choose their favorite artwork. The Bonifas Arts Center uses the proceeds to promote art and cultural activities in the Upper Peninsula.

 

RELATED: Artists shine with ‘Best of’ awards at Waterfront Art Festival

 

The youth tent was moved to center of the displays this year. They displayed artwork they have been working on throughout the year. The tent was at full capacity.

"The Young Artists Market was at its best with everything from paintings and drawings to metalsmithing and pottery," Warstler said.

A steady stream of kids lined up at the Kids Tent for hand-on paper projects. It included drawings and sculptures made of colored paper.

The Kids Tent provided hours of hands-on fun with creative paper-crafts sponsored by Verso. Watch for the kids’ artistry at the U.P. State Fair," said Warstler.

The Waterfront Art Festival was sponsored by the Bonifas Arts Center, City of Escanaba, Verso Corporation, Thrivent, U.P. State Credit Union, Northern Insurance and FedEx.

 

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More than 50 artists participated at the Waterfront Art Festival Saturday at Ludington Park in Escanaba. Media included watercolor, photography, fiber, oil painting, pottery, jewelry, woodworking and much more.

Best of awards were presented during the show. Kathy Kuczek of Vulcan, Mich., won Best of Show. She is an author, illustrator and plein air artist. She was featured in the Powers Gallery this past January with a group of plein air painters. Her work can be seen at www.kathykuczek.com.

Waterfront Art Festival winners included:

Winners received a monetary award and a ribbon.

 

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This year’s Waterfront Art Festival will feature a kaleidoscopic array of art for sale at more than 50 booths—alongside a variety of music, food, learning, and more — Aug. 6 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Ludington Park near the Karas Memorial Bandshell.

The festival, presented by the Bonifas Arts Center, is a “spectacular event,” said Aaron Deiter, Bonifas volunteer, fun for all ages, ideal for serious collectors seeking the “quality, professional art” and casual shoppers seeking “something unique” as well as curious browsers.

The festival will showcase new artists and returning favorites from across the Upper Peninsula and northeast Wisconsin, including metalworking, soap products, jewelry, photography, paintings, white henna body art, and much more, said Christina Diment, Bonifas special events coordinator.

Attendees can take in a range of music, including the Remnants and Augie & Theresa, and a performance by Goddess Bellydance; sample food, including pasties from First United Methodist, We Be Poppin’ kettle corn, Matilda’s elephant ears, and Norm’s Famous French Fries, or try Red Barn Food or Ram and Pony; and perhaps win art by buying raffle tickets, said Diment.

The easily-accessible lakeshore location in the spacious park, with its majestic trees, helps make the event a “magical experience,” said Deiter, different from festivals in cities that, while wonderful, can feel overcrowded and “trapped in concrete.”

Additional booths—including the Friends of the Library and Public Health “tobacco free” tents—will offer the chance to learn, said Diment.

Bonifas instructors will demonstrate techniques and answer questions at another tent, including Heather Budkis with Ashtanga Yoga from 11 a.m. to noon, Diane Kribs-Mays with produce printing from 1 to 2 p.m., and Kate Oman with steampunk from 2 to 3 p.m., said Corinne Haberstich, Bonifas education coordinator.

The festival has drawn more than 3,000 attendees in past years, said Pasqua Warstler, Bonifas artistic director.

Waterfront sponsors include the City of Escanaba, Bays de Noc Convention and Visitors Bureau, Verso, Thrivent, U.P. State Credit Union, Northern Insurance, and FedEx.

 

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The Young Artists’ Market tent, presented by the Bonifas Arts Center, will showcase the creations of local youths (18 and under) selling their diverse work at the Waterfront Art Festival.

Corinne Haberstich, Bonifas education coordinator, had high expectations, but the work submitted by young artists this year—including jewelry, cards, photography, woodworking, and sculpture—exceeded her expectations, she said. “These kids are amazing,” said Haberstich. “They really are.”

The young artists will sell their work Aug. 6 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Ludington Park near the Karas Memorial Bandshell.

 

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The annual Waterfront Art Festival will feature a kaleidoscopic array of art for sale at more than 50 booths—alongside a variety of music, food, and more—Aug. 6 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Ludington Park near the Karas Memorial Bandshell.

The festival, presented by the Bonifas Arts Center, will showcase the work of new artists and returning favorites from across the Upper Peninsula and northeast Wisconsin.

 

LAST YEAR: Lots of activity at the Waterfront Art Festival

 

When Christina Diment, Bonifas special events coordinator, first attended the festival, she was “blown away” by the variety of items for sale, including metalworking, soap products, jewelry, photography, paintings, and much more.

The festival features “good, original, affordable artwork,” said Pasqua Warstler, Bonifas artistic director.

Attendees also can take in a range of live music, including the Remnants and Augie & Theresa; sample food, including pasties from First United Methodist Church, We Be Poppin’ kettle corn, and Norm’s Famous French Fries; and perhaps win art by buying raffle tickets, said Diment.

Sandy Wilson, president of the East Ludington Gallery co-op, said she looks forward to the festival every year and would “encourage anybody, young and old, to go” since it offers “something for everybody.”

The festival, which has drawn more than 3,000 attendees in past years, is “inviting to all age groups,” so it’s a perfect opportunity for “family fun,” said Warstler.

Waterfront attracts so many—locals and visitors—that it becomes a time to connect with friends and socialize, said Wilson.

Artists can benefit from having a booth at the festival, said Wilson, while also enjoying the experience. “It gets your name out there and could lead to many sales in the future,” she said. Artists selected as “Best of Show” and “Best of Category” also will be honored.

Artists can download an application or find out more information by calling 906-786-3833.

 

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Young artists (18 and under) can register through July 30 to sell their creations at the Young Artists’ Market tent, presented by the Bonifas Arts Center, during the Waterfront Art Festival.

“Kids get the pleasure of making their artwork and then displaying it, seeing the joy it brings to the person buying it,” and gain business skills, said Sandy Wilson, East Ludington Gallery co-op president.

 

LAST YEAR: Young Artist Market a hit at Waterfront Art Festival

 

In past years, young artists—whose quality, innovative, and diverse work always amazes—have sold jewelry, paintings, magnets, nightlights, and wooden toys, said Corinne Haberstich, Bonifas education coordinator.

They will sell their work Aug. 6 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Ludington Park near the Karas Memorial Bandshell.

An application and sample creation must be submitted, with a $5 registration fee, to the Bonifas by 3 p.m. July 30. Download an application, call 906-786-3833, or stop by the Bonifas.

 

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Anthony Strublic of Marinette, Wis., was named Best of Show at the Waterfront Art Festival for his drawings of Great Lakes vessels.

He does graphite pencil drawing of Great Lakes ships and lighthouses. He says he was fascinated with the Titanic and started doodling as a kid.

"There's very little of this type of art that I've seen so I like to think that I have come up with something original," Strublic said.

People are drawn to his artwork, Strublic said, because of a fascination they have with ships on the Great Lakes.

"Everywhere you go, any port you go to it's just amazing the people that will sit there and watch for these boats to come in. It's just unreal," he said.

Other award winners included:

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Sunny weather kept the crowds constant throughout the day at the Waterfront Art Festival Saturday in Ludington Park. More than 60 exhibitors displayed their artwork during the event.

"It was a beautiful day. The weather was good, the crowds were great, the music was fun and I think the exhibitors did well during the day," said Pasqua Warstler, executive and gallery director at the Bonifas Fine Arts Center.

The Waterfront Art Festival is a juried show held the first Saturday of August.

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Young artists offered a wide variety of work at the Waterfront Art Festival. Items included paintings, wall hangings and even medieval swords and shields.

"The reaction to the Young Artists Market from the festival goers was tremendous," said Brook McGinnis, events coordinator at the Bonifas. "The kids really like knowing that people appreciate their work."

Youth programming has always been a priority for the William Bonifas Fine Arts Center. Their Art Scene program, Fourth Grade Afield, and annual Youth in Art exhibit alone would be considered prodigious for any non-profit arts organization. But add to that their yearly partnership with Players de Noc to host the Missoula Children’s Theatre, and the opportunities they provide students at the Waterfront Art Festival, and the Bonifas is truly a leader in bringing arts to the youth of this community.

Each summer the Waterfront Art Festival appears, Brigadoonesque, near the Karas Bandshell in Ludington Park. This summer’s festival was on Saturday August 1 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. It’s a chance for artists of all types, including kids, to display and sell their wares to the public.

Part of what the Waterfront offers each year is the Young Artists’ Market, where students are able to set up shop and display their own works. And as long as it’s all original and handmade by the student, the sky is the limit in terms of what they can sell.

As one of those students, Gabe Peterson has been participating in the Young Artists’ Market for the past three years. His Medieval-style “Wooden Weaponz” typically sell out long before the day is done. Last year his entire stock was gone before noon.

Like most of the students, Gabe makes all of his items by hand. In his case he starts as early as April, researching the weaponry of the time, purchasing his materials (using the profits of his previous year’s sales), and creating templates for each of his pieces to ensure consistency in his product.

He was just one of potentially 18 students who sold items such as bracelets, beaded night lights, keychains, earrings, and even hand-decorated flip flops. Clearly, when youth and exuberance pairs up with art, it obviously pays off.

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